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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
much for joining us inside "the war room." tim dickinson of "rolling stone" magazine. roe v. wade is the law of the land. americans overwhelmingly support a woman's right to choose. michigan handed president obama a 9-point victory five weeks ago so when i see a legislative body sneakily passing anti-choice members in the proverbial dead of night the phrase subverting the will of the people seems mild. my thoughts on that right after the break. ♪ ♪ destined to take them over. the uconnect command center with sirius xm satellite radio in the new 2013 ram 1500. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. >> jennifer: back in march of 1984 the owner of the baltimore colts moved baltimore's beloved football team to indianapolis. he said he wouldn't do it but in the middle of the night 12 mayflower moving trucks were hired to tear out the region's heart and soul under cover of darkness. it was incredibly unpopular extremely underhanded. and it devastated the people. it even brought baltimore's mayor to tears.
, roe v. wade was thought to be in imminent peril. and i think what 2012 did was to reconfigure all of that. it feels as if the ice is breaking, as if you had three states for the first time through popular vote, for example, endorse same sex marriage. you had the people of california in a popular referendum vote to tax themselves to address their state's chronic deficit. these are things that may in the long run be as important as the re-election of barack obama. >> woodruff: how do you see this year? >> well, in the '80s and '90s there was a tendency to think that the president, voters who vote for president are center right and the republicans had an varntion '80s and '90s. in the wake of this election, you have to go back to 1988 to find a republican president who was elected by anything other than a squeaker, that probably tells something that i think the electorate, exactly as you are saying, maybe is beginning to shift. >> woodruff: but again, we've had moments in history when one party or another seemed to hit a bend in the road, when when popular opinion changed. michael, a
roe v. wade was thought to be in imminent peril. and i think what 2012 did was to reconfigure all of that. it feels as if the ice is breaking, as if you had three states for the first time through popular vote for example endorse same sex marriage. you had the people of california in a popular referendum vote to tax themselves to address their state's chronic deficit. these are things that may in the long run be as important as the re-election of barack obama. >> woodruff: how do you see this year? >> well, in the '80s and '90s there was a tendency to think that the president voters who vote for president are center right and the republicans had an varntion '80s and '90s. in the wake of this election you have to go back to 1988 to find a republican president who was elected by anything other than a squeaker, that probably tells something that i think the electorate, exactly as you are saying maybe is beginning to shift. >> woodruff: but again, we've had moments in history when one party or another seemed to hit a bend in the road when when popular opinion changed. michael, as you
of the same-sex marriage issue. that might result in what would essentially be the roe v. wade of gay rights. >> thanks for that. >>> back to you, molly. you were doing a big piece of this for "the atlantic" for next week. what did you find most interesting in your research thus far? >> the really amazing thing about this issue is how far public opinion has come in a relatively short time on the scale of sort of large-scale social change. when gallup recently polled public opinion on gay marriage, it had the support of 53% of the american public. back in 1996 that was 27%. and that was the atmosphere in which president clinton and the congress were passing the defense of marriage act. since then, every single appellate court that has considered it has ruled against it. that's something that advocates feel very confident about the supreme court going their way. on the proposition 8 case, advocates are a little bit more nervous. this is a conservative court. and if they do rule against proposition 8 and gay marriage in california, that would strike a blow against gay marriage that could last f
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)